Divorce & Social Media

From sharing photos from your adventures and posting your thoughts and opinions to staying up-to-date with your loved ones’ lives and current events, social media has become a significant part of our day-to-day lives. Although platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram make the world more connected than ever before, personal information within social media accounts can be used as admissible evidence in divorce proceedings.

The following are several ways social media can have a negative impact on your divorce case:

  • Accused of hiding assets – If you are your spouse are involved in a contentious dispute over finances, whether it’s over property division or alimony, posting pictures of lavish vacations, multiple vehicles, and expensive clothing and food can lead to questions about hidden assets and a more favorable outcome for the other party.
  • Accused of being a bad parent – If you are vying for primary custody of your child or visitation rights, social media activity can be used to demonstrate whether or not you’re fit for the role. For example, if there is a photo of you drinking or out with your friends when you’re supposed to be supervising the kids, your spouse could use that picture to convince the court you are not responsible to have child custody.
  • Accused of alienating your kids – Whether it’s positive or negative, many of us share our thoughts on social media. However, if you post negative comments about your spouse regarding a child custody battle, he/she may claim that you are attempting to alienate the children.
  • Accused of adultery – Although it is not wise to date during a divorce, many people do so anyway. However, your spouse can accuse you of adultery, which can affect alimony and child custody decisions. On the other hand, posting pictures online of your new flame can make your spouse jealous, resulting in a more contentious legal battle.

As soon as you or your spouse files for divorce, it is important to avoid using social media until an agreement is reached. Adjust your privacy settings and prevent your information from being accessed by the public. Make sure you block your spouse and any mutual friends since it is possible for your spouse to gather information from shared acquaintances, despite privacy settings. Turn off geo-tag features and tell your friends to stop tagging you in anything. Lastly, only vent about the case to your lawyer, rather than online.

If you are interested in filing for divorce in Long Island, contact our experienced legal team at Friedman & Friedman today.

Categories: Divorce